Product management is the perfect blend between business, design, and development.  It is the crux of what drive innovation and its still not a class taught at major univeristies across the country.  In this speaker series we explore just what makes a product manager and what it takes to be the nexus of innovation at a tech company.

Our panel seated left to right: Rick Orr (RealSavvy), Rob Feinstein (Product Management Executive), Josh Lipton (Favor). Our moderator, Dan Corbin (Return Path) is seen below.

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Missed it? Let's cover some of the fine points:

If you’re looking to get into product management…

  • Do you need to be a technical person? Not necessarily. You need to be logical and pragmatic because you’re explaining your ideas to someone else who will create it. “Tap into the structured side of your brain.” - Feinstein

  • “Live between really understanding the customer and getting the engineers to really understand the customers. They are the only ones who can create things for our customers.” - Lipton

  • “Keep things stupid simple at first. Don’t get caught up in tools. Get a product out first.” - Orr

On removing unconscious bias when thinking of your customer and their needs…

The tech industry as a whole has been under fire for lack of diversity in the tech industry. There are always ways to make your product more useful and it begins with diversifying your workforce, get lots and lots of feedback, and use data to back it up.

“We survey runners and personal e-mails to have real conversations, at the end of the day - there’s no way to eliminate the biases built into me. Figuring out how to build processes that keep us honest will work,” Lipton said.

Corbin asks his daughter these three questions daily:

  • What’s something kind you did?

  • What’s something brave you did?

  • What’s something that you failed at?

“Because if you’re not kind to your team and customers, or if you’re not being brave and taking chances, or admitting when you’ve failed, you won’t be as successful as a Product Manager."